Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Save the Date Sept. 13, 2014 RED FALL opening













RED FALL

Sept. 13, 2014 – Oct. 1, 2014
 

   In anticipation of the long awaited cooler autumn season, J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art, Boerne will spotlight a selection of paintings for September 2014 Second Saturday Art & Wine;  bringing excitement to the impressionistic qualities of fall landscapes paintings in an exhibit titled: “RED FALL”.
 
Gathering 10 artists ranging from Texas Vintage artists like W.A. Slaughter and Porfirio Salinas to regional icons, Cliff Cavin and Sidney Sinclair to local star Russell Stephenson - Gallery Director, Gabriel Diego Delgado has curated a handful of artworks from the gallery collection that culminate to a visual epiphany of the seasonal change.  A red, orange and earthy toned exhibition tugs at the hopeful demise of an overheated summer; an artistic voice that speaks of a desperate need to a temperature departure.

With a nostalgic sense of crisp leaves crunching underfoot, a smell of cool autumn nights and a wishful thought of a quenching rain, RED FALL is the light at the end of the tunnel; a visual reminder there are colder nights ahead, there are times we can open our windows and doors, and not all days in South Texas are outdoorfurnace-scape.

 Who:
J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art, Boerne

What:
“Red Fall”, a group show celebrating fall inspired landscapes.

When:
Opening : Saturday, September 13, 2014 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Free and open to the Public

Where:
JR Mooney Galleries, Boerne
305 S. Main St Boerne, TX 78006   ph. 830-816-5106





 

SELECT HIGHLIGHTS

FROM

RED FALL!


*click the image to purchase the work online before the opening.
 
Texas Fall Landscape
W.A. Slaughter
24" x 36"
Oil
$14,000.00

 
Fall on the Guadalupe
Cliff Cavin
30" x 40"
Oil
$5,100.00

 
Summer Day
Porfirio Salinas
12" x 16"
Oil
$10,250.00

 
Fall Texas Landscape
Randy Peyton
24" x 36"
Oil
$4,500.00

 
Autumn Daze
Sidney Sinclair
18" x 24"
Oil
$1,575.00

*RED FALL exclusive, painting will be available for purchase for first time at opening night!!! 

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

RED FALL save the date

For Immediate Release:
RED FALL
Sept. 13, 2014 – Oct. 1, 2014
In anticipation of the long awaited cooler autumn season, J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art, Boerne will spotlight a selection of paintings for September 2014 Second Saturday Art & Wine;  bringing excitement to the impressionistic qualities of fall landscapes paintings in an exhibit titled: “RED FALL”.

Gathering 10 artists ranging from Texas Vintage artists like W.A. Slaughter and Porfirio Salinas to regional icons, Cliff Cavin and Sidney Sinclair to local star Russell Stephenson - Gallery Director, Gabriel Diego Delgado has curated a handful of artworks from the gallery collection that culminate to a visual epiphany of the seasonal change.  A red, orange and earthy toned exhibition tugs at the hopeful demise of an overheated summer; an artistic voice that speaks of a desperate need to a temperature departure.

With a nostalgic sense of crisp leaves crunching underfoot, a smell of cool autumn nights and a wishful thought of a quenching rain, RED FALL is the light at the end of the tunnel; a visual reminder there are colder nights ahead, there are times we can open our windows and doors, and not all days in South Texas are outdoor furnace-scape.

 Who:
J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art, Boerne

What:
“Red Fall”, a group show celebrating fall inspired landscapes.

When:
Opening : Saturday, September 13, 2014 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Free and open to the Public

Where:
JR Mooney Galleries, Boerne
305 S. Main St Boerne, TX 78006   ph. 830-816-5106



J. R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art / 305 S. Main / Boerne, TX. 78006 / 830-816-5106



Saturday, August 23, 2014

August 2014 edition of "Mooney Makes Sense" in Boerne Business Monthly


Going Once, Going Twice

Sold!

Auction Houses have been a mainstay in the art world for centuries, with the oldest art auction house title belonging to Stockholms Auktionsverk, founded in 1674. Perishable goods, spoils of war, land, personal possessions, prisoners, slaves and serfs are just a few of the things that have seen the auction block in the last 300 years.  Fine art has not been different; looted and pillaged art found their way to the mainstream auction houses.  After WWII the German Nazis stole priceless fine art from hundreds and hundreds of families with some eventually resurfacing at auction; prompting many art collectors to reevaluate legal ownership.  Instances like these court battle cases prompted the creation of The Lost Art Register where families can claim ownership rights and auctioneers and auction houses can register fine art to compare with this extensive database of missing art.

The top ten auction houses in the world include Bonhams, Christie’s, Dorotheum, Phillips de Pury & Company, Sotheby’s, Stockholms Auktionsverk, Tajan, and Villa Grisebach Auktionen.  Take no fear Texas, there is a small group of trusted art auction houses right here in the Lonestar State, giving us opportunity to buy, sell and ponder fine art selections without traveling to the coasts or over oceans .

 Vogt Auction, Heritage Auction, Altermann Auctioneers, and Simpson Auctioneers a few of the fine art auction houses available to the public, not counting local representatives to Sotheby’s, and Christie’s.

It is always a unique experience to find that “needle in the haystack” when filtering through estate sales or auctions.  These matchless artworks can be an original by an unknown painter or a rediscovered masterpiece by a world renowned artist.

Two such works that have graced the walls of JR Mooney Galleries to be found from an estate include the irreplaceable paintings by Gail Sherman Corbett (1871-1952) and Anthonius Henricus “Toon” Koster (1913-1989).

Corbett was a student of the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris from 1898-1899. Her pictorial depictions of turn-of-the-century Paris street scenes cemented her reputation as a leading female figure in the Impressionistic genre. Her achievements include memberships to the National Sculpture Society, 1907, Architectural League of New York; National Association of Women Artists, and American Numistic Society.  Outstanding exhibition histories include Art Institute of Chicago, 1912, 1916; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Annual, 1902-06 (as Sherman), 1913; Panama Pacific International Exposition, 1915 (medal); National Association of Women Artists, 1935 (medal); National Sculpture Society, 1923. Corbett is also referenced in the Who Was Who in American Art, 1564-1975, Sound View Press.

Antonius "Toon" Koster, a renowned Dutch artist, was born in Schiedam, (South Holland) Netherlands in 1913. He went to the Art Academy in Rotterdam, Netherlands and became a painter, printmaker, industrial artist, enamellist and muralist. During most of his artistic career he lived and worked in Nieuwkoop near the Nieuwkoopse Plassen. Koster was a member of the Dutch Federation of Visual Artists, and died November 25, 1989 in Woerden, Netherlands. Koster often used dark earthy colors and painted in broad coarse brush strokes, creating depressive and gloomy atmospheres; making for subtle impressionistic qualities. When asked to which movement he belonged or which subjects he preferred, he answered: “There is no movement… and everything repeats itself.”

Gallery Presidents, Directors, and Owners, including Mr. Robert Mooney of J.R. Mooney Galleries take stock of local auction houses, lots and estates looking for treasures to add to an already impressive gallery stock of inventory.

©Gabriel Diego Delgado

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

JR Mooney Galleries in Art World News Magazine

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JR Mooney Galleries

is Proud to be

part of bi-coastal article by Sarah

Seamark in Art World News Magazine

about trends in national art galleries.


See the full article at: 

www.artworldnews.com




***Below is an excerpt of the full article regarding JR Mooney Galleries of Fine Art of Boerne, Texas.*** 
 
Excerpt from "When to Bring in New Art and What to Choose", by Sarah Seamark in the August 2014 edition of Art World News Magazine

….."For Gabriel Delgado, Director of the Boerne, TX, location of J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art that is also in San Antonio, the challenge was how to transition the gallery from the impressionistic landscape genre, with some Western art, for which J.R. Mooney has been known for 68 years. Originally, Joe Mooney, an artist himself, was a supporter of local artists who were getting their feet wet. When his son Robert took over, he wanted to go beyond the South Texas market to California, New York, and Europe, and bring back Impressionist artists to Texas. He felt this style would suit the old San Antonio families the gallery served, many in the oil business, and with traditional tastes. “Even now, San Antonio as an art community is three to five years behind Houston, and that is two to three years behind New York, as far as trending aesthetics are concerned. So there is a catch-up,” observes Mr. Delgado who has lived on both coasts, as well as in Houston. “Change comes slowly, and you have to educate people on a new look. “When I came into the gallery, appreciating the history and success of the Mooney family, I took a look at their client base and saw we were dealing with second and third generations of clients who had been buying from the gallery. The third generation grew up with Impressionism in their grandparents’ homes and that decor doesn’t match their decor. A lot of it has been going to Christie’s and Sotheby’s.

He decided to analyze what style of art would suit these budding collectors. “They already appreciated fine art (having grown up with it), but their tastes were different from the previous generations.” He came to understand that here is a client that needs educating, and that their tastes would not be on the cutting edge of contemporary art, but more in tune with the South Texas art scene. As a result, he began introducing the work of contemporary artists into the Boerne location of J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art, but nothing too far out. Among them is Russell Stephenson, a San Antonio artist who does abstracted landscapes of Texas in a style that is beyond impressionism and more about swatches of color and movement. In fact, his work has characteristics of abstract expressionism. “So here we have a ‘bridging’ artist going from Impressionism to Abstract Expressionism— and they are willing to add him to their collection as it is not a huge jump.” Another artist Mr. Delgado introduced is Louis Vega Trevino, also from San Antonio, and known as a minimalist, particularly for his stripe paintings. “All it is is various strata of stripes from a color theory application. So people who have traditional landscapes need to be educated on why it makes sense to pair it with a landscape—or bring it into a room dominated by traditional work. “Our market is very unique because we are tied to what our clients are familiar with and have had to help them understand new work.” However, the proof of the value of this exercise can be found in the numbers. Between April 2013 and April 2014, sales of fine art in the Boerne location of J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art increased by threefold. Much of this Mr. Delgado attributes to creating a buzz around contemporary work both from new artists and by artists already with the gallery who were encouraged to “push the boundaries.”

See the full article at: 

www.artworldnews.com
 

Be sure to watch for our upcoming Fall exhibitions including more of Russell Stephenson's artwork as well as favorite Texas Vintage artists.
 

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Tonight is Second Saturday Aug. 9-2014 (4pm - 8pm)

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Second Saturday

is

Tonight!!!

 
 

***Blown Glass*** 

Noel Hart

Internationally Acclaimed Glass Artist

"Swift Parrots on Bruny Island"
Glass
15" x 21" x 3.5"

$11,400.00




 

Kahva
Chinese Abstract Expressionist 

"Radiate"
Oil

30 x 40"
$835.00



 

**Margie Barker**

-Detail of "Cactus and Bunny"
Acrylic 

22" x 28"
$850.00


Circa. 1986
 


 
**Sidney Sinclair**

"Cross Creation"
Oil

5" x 5"
$150.00



 

Saturday, August 2, 2014

New Arrivals

 

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NEW

ARRIVALS

 

***ORIGINAL*** 

G. HARVEY
Internationally Acclaimed Western Painter

"Carriage Sketch II"
Watercolor
3.5" x 4"
$1,685.00


Framed in gold embellished frame with 100% linen liner and museum quality glass

 

**W.A. Slaughter**
Texas Vintage Artist

Fall Scene
Oil

24" x 36"
Call for pricing


American Artist William A. or W. A. Slaughter b. 1923-2000.

W. A. Slaughter grew up in Texas amid the splendor and beauty of the Hill Country. He was a unique fusion of Lutheran minister and artist. However, painting was always beckoning and he began painting full-time in 1972. 

**Kahva**

"Infusion"
Oil

30" x 40"
$600.00


Chinese Abstract Painter
Lives in Beijing, China
Graduated from the Beijing Art Academy
 
**Joe Peacock**
Texas Vintage Artist

Oil

24" x 18"
$1,500.00


Joe Peacock, Texas claimed artist; spent 27 years in the Lone Star State. Born in Detroit, Michigan Peacock’s family moved to Del Rio when he was an infant. Recalling early memories of mesquite, sagebrush, and cactus, Peacock’s vivid Texas landscape recollections of the Pecos area were influenced by his father’s onsite vocation of water well driller. Accompanying his father into the field, Peacock witnessed firsthand the rugged life of the cowboy, oil field hand, and ranch hand in the sweltering heat of the Texas sun.

Given rise in the 1970’s and 80’s Peacock is rarely see on the local Art Market. His following is primarily tied to Texas Artist Collectors, with only minimal originals ever leaving the collectors’ coveted compilations.

**Porfirio Salinas**
Texas Vintage Artist

Oil

12" x 16"
$10,250.00


"...It was in the early ‘60s when art from the J.R. Mooney Gallery began appearing in the residences of heads of state. Artist Porfirio Salinas was not only a client of the gallery but also one of the favorite artists of then-Vice President Lyndon Johnson. Johnson presented paintings created by Salinas and framed by the Mooney Gallery to President John Kennedy, who displayed them among his art collection in the White House. Salinas, whose artwork was subsequently displayed in the White House during the Johnson administration, continued to be represented by the gallery until his death in 1973. Since the Kennedy administration, J.R. Mooney Gallery has provided framing services for every American president and every Texas governor after John Connally."

* Excerpt from Bob Mooney at JR Mooney Galleries, 

Continuing in the family tradition at J.R. Mooney Galleries as seen in 78209 Magazine, Article by Chris Duel.

http://78209magazine.com/featured/bob-mooney

 

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Gallery Picks of the Month, JR Mooney Galleries of Fine Art

Recap and Closing of our "Gallery Picks" curated hanging for the July Second Saturday

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Gail Sherman Corbett was a well-known sculptor, painter, and medalist who flourished as an artist in New York during the early decades of the 20th century.  Gail Sherman was born in Syracuse, New York, in 1872, and attended the local high school and later the Anne Brown School in New York City.  Sherman began her formal artistic training at the Art Students League in New York City, where she studied with the famous sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens, and the painters Henry Siddons Mowbray, a celebrated muralist, and George deForest Brush, a painter of colorful genre scenes. 

Later, she traveled to Paris and enrolled in the École des Beaux-arts from 1898-99.  During her sojourn in Paris, Sherman was exposed to the work of the Impressionists, from whom she incorporated a looser brushwork, lighter palette, and interest in contemporary urban scenes. 

The present work Avenue Parisienne was most likely painted during the artist's time in Paris.  The contemporary subject matter, fluid brushwork, and light-infused palette reflect the influence of the Impressionists on the artist's early painting style.
 

  • National Sculpture Society, 1907

  • Architectural League of New York

  • National Association of Women Artists

  • American Numistic Society

  • Art Institute of Chicago, 1912, 1916

  • Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Annual, 1902-06 (as Sherman), 1913

  • Panama Pacific International Exposition, 1915 (medal)

  • National Association of Women Artists, 1935 (medal)

  • National Sculpture Society, 1923

  • Who Was Who in American Art, 1564-1975, Sound View Press

  • E. Bénézit Dictionnaire des Peintres, Sculpteurs, Dessinateurs et Graveurs, Editions Gründ

Jose Vives-Atsara used the palate knife with mastery and confidence to reveal dark blue clouds, threatening sky, and a windy day that rousts about the vegetation and bank of sandy soil.

The title of this painting is Wind and Vives-Atsara illustrated the grasses in extended length and overlapped colors and strokes to communicate the windy movement. The strokes are intentional and bold as he used his preferred limited signature of nine colors. The vertical and horizontal lines compete and skillfully design the effect of the unseen wind.  This is not a sunny windy day, rather, a dark ominous day; even the cloud formation signifies weather change and possibly more wind with even stronger force.

The painting is respectful of nature and the beauty before and during times of wind. 


©Betty Houston

Antonius "Toon" Koster, a renowned Dutch artist, was born in Schiedam, (South Holland) Netherlands in 1913. He went to the Art Academy in Rotterdam, Netherlands and became a painter, printmaker, industrial artist, enamellist and muralist.  During most of his artistic career he lived and worked in Nieuwkoop near the Nieuwkoopse Plassen.

Koster was a member of the Dutch Federation of Visual Artists, and died November 25, 1989 in Woerden, Netherlands.  Koster often used dark earthy colors and painted in broad coarse brush strokes, creating depressive and gloomy atmospheres; making for subtle impressionistic qualities.  When asked to which movement he belonged or which subjects he preferred, he answered: “There is no movement… and everything repeats itself.”

“Night City”, is a signature city-scape by Koster that exemplifies all that he was known for: boats, cities, gloom, illuminating sun/moon behind clouds, and his pictorial post WWII depressive metropolis.  A one point perspective only exacerbates the depressive complexity of the work with the angling of the drab buildings that line the boulevards, structures as borders for the blackened water in the industrial canal, a waterline that is cut midway down the composition with the three arched bridge.   We are boxed in on three sides with the horizon line blocking an eternal view.

 However, our release from the melancholy is up into the sky, but wait – impending catastrophes await us in the heavy snow laden billows that weigh down on us with only a glimmer of light; a false hope.

Friedrich Nietzsche once said “Hope in reality is the worst of all evils because it prolongs the torments of man.” ‘Tis true when dealing with Anthonius Henricus “Toon” Koster.


© Gabriel Diego Delgado

 

Eric Paulsen captures the light of day with fresh color and bold strokes of the palette knife.   Bridge in Town is a study in contrasts. He comments on the simple village and the common bridge ; the curved waterway, straight angles of roof tops and windows are central to the composition.  Neutral tones are the axis of the painting; yet harmonious with plantings, water and sky.  Warm tones of yellow and orange are sparingly used in contrast to the range of blues in water and sky.

The vegetation is mostly small abundant strokes with the pallet knife and the most contrasting in depth as compared with other surfaces. The most placid and quiet texture in the painting is that of the water with its mirror like image of shadows. Although there are three persons on the bridge, one appears to be fishing and the others are standing obliviously and quietly. It is this sum of contrasts that make Bridge in Town a gallery favorite. 


©Betty Houston

..."Tulok, a native to Budapest has always enjoyed painting and drawing.  He credits his break from his professional career in 1989 as a life changing decision that jumpstarted his professional artistic endeavors. Refining his trade and using a little fine art finesse, Tulok’s art is very distinguishing with a characteristic Renaissance style.

 Having mastered the art of painting on copper, Tulok has found a unique ground that has allowed his colors to flourish.  Part old master painter, part Realist, Tulok has rediscovered the chiaroscuro aesthetic; allowing a new generation of patrons to explore the blackened surroundings and out of view light source- accentuating the traditional still-life compositions.  His soft shadows, deep crimsons, and vibrant hues could not be achieved any other way, but with the exploration of this unusual metallic undercoating.

Often exaggerating the dew, moisture, and condensation on the elements in the composition, Tulok redefines a classical conception with a still life reemergence."

© Gabriel Diego Delgado

Sidney Sinclair is a resident of the Texas Hill country and knows and loves its beauty.  In her painting titled Hill Country Creek the simplicity of nature is painted using subtle soft tones and neighboring hues.

The lines and edges mingle and invite a visual tour across the canvas.  Soft light of day conveys a single quiet moment honoring the landscape in its raw strength and beauty.

The application of paint is respectfully layered without additional flourish; thereby,  achieving an ode to nature that is not intended to be anything more or less than already provided by nature.


©Betty Houston

The majestic skylines of Texas radiate an unexplainable beauty – the kind that harkens to the tributary songs of stars at night and the like in all its nostalgic inspirations.  Whether you’re experiencing the charming and subtle horizons of Corpus Christi, the flat plains of Lubbock and Plainview or the rugged mountains of Big Bend to the rolling Hill Country there is something unmistakable in its atmospheric awesomeness; with its sunrises and sunsets, its vast openness, or its terrifying and turbulent storms.

Russell Stephenson, a Texas painter, in an unrelenting approach has mastered the gorgeous godliness of our great state in his Panoramic Texas series paintings. Radiant browns and various tones of burnt sienna seem to meddle perfectly with contrasting cool slate grays, snowy silvers and wispy whites.  Atmospheric amalgamations of colors are ever approachable, digestible and delicate in their ephemeral and abstracted beauty.

In “Mesa”, Stephenson delivers a medium size rectangle painting, one that is anchored by a distinguishable plateau that is concisely centered, mingled and engulfed by feathered heavens that glow with an inner radiance; something that can only achieved by some cosmic enlightenment.  The top half of the painting is accented with marks or controlled chaos of the artist’s hand touches the panel in a series of deliberate gestures through pressure, contemplation and automatic subconscious responses.

© Gabriel Diego Delgado

William Henry Margetson studied at the South Kensington Schools and at the Royal Academy, where he exhibited from 1885. Known more as an illustrator for literary classics like The Tiger of Mysore, Trefoil, The Spider's Eye, A March on London, Red Morn, The Lights of Sydney, and Straits of Time by Christopher Hare; Margetson executed a series of small paintings he titled “In the Straits of Time”- a collective of watercolor/gauche paintings and prints that were based on a play of the book by Hare.  Usually upbeat and full of whimsical muse, Margetson’s female figures border on illustrious Art Deco beauties, however with “In the Straits of Time”, he  forces us to ponder the lives of the misfortunate.

Recounting tails of death, famine, misery and the Black Plague, Margetson provides a monotone palette of black and white melancholic images that evoke a sense of dire straits.  Of the 5 works available, one can be singled out as a masterfully denoted summarization of such a series. The singular painting depicts the scene in the book/play where four completely different types of people inhabit the same room; each wholly concerned about the deteriorating health of a little girl.  Grimly silhouetted in the background, a Catholic Nun and a Victorian Englishman lurk off to the left hand side. Concealed in shadows, they come to represent so much more than mere mortal aspirations.  Metaphorically, the older man’s grimace and fragility mocks the innocence and jubilation of the adolescent little girl, while the Nun ponders an existential afterlife bound by the glory of faith, accepting of her inevitable fate and infantile demise.

Stark contrasts can be drawn between the two characters [caregiver and child]. Head wrap, shawl, bedding, and nightgown give sterile misconstrued assumptions of purity. Engulfed  in a tender embrace, the motherly figures have eyes that are shut with tenderness; a sentimentality one can only give with sincere compassion; while the dazed and widen eyes of the child turn a gaze to the unknown, with an apprehension of a beckoning light drawing ever closer.

© Gabriel Diego Delgado