Friday, January 22, 2016

Jan. 2016 News from J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art



The Jan. 2016 edition of the Boerne Business Monthly has a wonderful article by Framing Desing & Art Consultant, Katherine Shevchenko on some great framing ideas for the new year. Check out her recommendations in the newest installment of "Mooney Makes Sense".

 
Click to Read Now
New Year, New Beginnings

New Ways to Integrate Art into your Home-Framing Ideas for the New Year

 
As the rush of the holidays start to ebb, one thing that many embark on is the annual ritual of clearing out the clutter of the old and making way for the new, but there are some memories that lay in wait, in storage in attics and in boxes, that are too precious and sentimental to be thrown away.  What most probably do not realize is that these memorabilia can be framed and beautifully displayed in your home, creating a personalized piece of art.

What must be factored when considering quality custom framing is that it is an investment, and will add enhancement to the décor and aesthetic to a room, while increasing and preserving the longevity of the subject, especially if it is a sensitive item.  Objects and memories of personal significance from family members can be passed down to future generations to memorialize past legacies and inspire future ones.  For instance, needlepoint works such as cross stitch, quilts, handmade blankets and clothes are able to be framed.  Memorials can be made from photos paired with an object of significance, such as a veteran’s photo paired with a medal or a folded flag can be used to honor their service.  With the utilization of a shadow box, which is a frame with a more pronounced depth there are endless possibilities for ideas.  Ceramic plates are also requested for framing, especially if they have been passed down carrying sentimental value.

 If so desired, and there is a preference to be able to still have access to an object, there is always a method of creating a cabinet style frame that can be opened and the item is able to be removed for dusting and examination.  There are numerous antiques that can be framed, such as letters, curios and vintage toys.  Framed baby clothes and even booties can be a delightful memory to display.  What better way to pay tribute to an event that is dear to your heart than highlighting a saved ticket stub from a special performance?  A creative way to present appreciation for a career or talent could be to have a key tool or implement that is iconic to their profession or craft, such as a brush, or even a medical instrument mounted for admiration.    Essentially, if you can name it, there is a high probability that it can be framed.

The motivations for framing are just as numerous, while there is the nostalgic aspect to capturing a cherished memento in the perfect setting of a delicately balanced frame, there are more functional reasons as well, especially as an element in interior design. It can be an embellishment to a home’s motif that provides a highlight or it can be a bold choice that is the main focal point in a room.  Do you have rolled up posters that are sitting in the back of your closet taking up space?  A reproduction print can be elevated visually with a much more esteemed status in a carefully selected arrangement.  A poster with eye catching graphics can provide plenty of visual interest and pop to an otherwise blank and neutral space.  Always research and make sure that the framer you choose is experienced and has a guarantee of quality on their work.  They will make it their priority that your precious items will be handled with conservation in mind.  Do not hesitate to ask questions about the methods that will be employed to secure your objects, in regards to their archival quality.  In order to prevent fading of colors, be sure to make sure that the glass being used will be providing 99% UV protection.  All items framed properly will be done with archival and ph neutral materials.  All needle points and fabric that are being stretched for the framing will always be stitched with care, never stapled or nailed to the substrate.  All artworks and paper should never touch the glass.  Not only unframed items should be accessed, but framed items as well, as some items framed from decades ago could be mounted on acidic materials, such as cardboard, which can cause discoloration over time.  A re-frame can give a much needed refreshing update and make an item new again and insuring its integrity over time.

As the New Year dawns, and assessments are made on what is needed and what is not; there are treasures that everyone has that are heirlooms from past loved ones, tokens of affection, or victorious keepsakes that are unquestionably special and irreplaceable in their significance. Perhaps, now is the time to start thinking about immortalizing them in a custom framing job that is unique as that particular item.

© Katherine Shevchenko
Art Consultant  
J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art is proud to announce that San Antonio artist, Cliff Cavin is a featured artist in a four person group exhibition at the Nave Museum in Victoria, Texas. We are so proud of Cliff and his institutional achievements. Look for more of Cliff's artwork at the San Antonio and Boerne Gallery locations.
The PSA created and sponsored by the Nave Museum featuring Cliff Cavin and other Texas painters.
Click to WATCH NOW
J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art is proud to announce that Gabriel Diego Delgado, the Gallery Director for the J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art-Boerne, has passed all coursework, related coursework examinations and final exams for the International Society of Appraisers (ISA) Core Course in Appraisal Studies. 

This completion of full coursework requirements and examinations grants Gabriel Diego Delgado competent to appraise fine art and conduct fine art appraisal reports that are prepared in conformity with and are subjected to the current version of the International Society of Appraisers Appraisal Report Writing Standards and Code of Ethics and will be reported in conformity with the current version of The Appraisal Foundation’s Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP).

The International Society of Appraisers (ISA) is the largest of the professional personal property appraisal associations representing the most highly trained and rigorously tested independent appraisers in the United States and Canada. They are a not-for-profit, member-driven association, formed to support the members’ needs and to enhance public trust by producing qualified and ethical appraisers who are recognized authorities in personal property appraising. ISA was founded in 1979. The Core Course in Appraisal Methodology is widely regarded as the most comprehensive in the industry, distinguishing ISA as the leader in methodology, theory, principles, practices and ethics. ISA's membership is diverse and collegiate. The members include many of the country's most respected appraisers, consultants, curators, scholars, gallerists, estate liquidators, auctioneers, and dealers. The four main divisions are: Antiques and Residential contents; Fine Art; Gemstones and Jewelry; and Machinery and Equipment.
 
J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art, a full service fine art gallery, will now add fine art appraisal services to their extensive registry of already established fine art related capabilities, including fine art custom framing, home consultations, acquisitions, procurements, and collection building.
 

ABOUT J.R. MOONEY GALLERIES OF FINE ART
J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art is a full service Fine Art Retail Gallery, specializing in Texas Vintage, Local & Regional, and Contemporary Art; coupled with a world renowned custom frame shop.

J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art was founded in San Antonio, Texas in 1947 by Joe and Adelle Mooney. Emerging as Modern Paint Company in 1947, with the largest selection of professional artist grade art supplies in San Antonio, the Mooney family eventually expanded their business.  Modern Paint Company became J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art to showcase local, regional and international artists while diving into custom framing, artist representation and other unique attributes.  J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art has an identity reflective of over a half-century existence; becoming custom framing experts and specializing in an array of museum quality art services.  J.R. Mooney Galleries is currently providing fine art services at their signature Broadway address in San Antonio and at their Boerne location.  J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art has provided framing services for every American President since John Kennedy and every Texas Governor since John Connally. The galleries have also supplied the Vatican, the Royal Palace in Madrid, Queen Beatrix of Holland, as well as major collections and collectors in Europe, Asia, South America and Australia.

J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art
8302 Broadway St.
San Antonio, TX 78209
(210) 828-8214
           &
305 S. Main St
Boerne, TX 78006
(830) 816-5106

Gallery Hours: San Antonio – Mon. – Sat. 10 am – 6 pm / Boerne – Tues. – Sat. 10 am – 5 pm
Admission is open to the public and FREE
Be sure to check out the newest edition of Plumage-TX Magazine, out now!
In the Dec. 2015 / Jan. 2016 copy you can read articles about current framing trends, new acquisitions, local art news and art related articles on G. Harvey, Rex Hausmann and Sidney Sinclair.
READ NOW
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Thursday, December 17, 2015

Art Consultant's Spotlight: "Everlasting Joy" by Sidney Sinclair


 “Everlasting Joy” by Sidney Sinclair is a recent acquisition by the J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art. This painting is part of Sinclair’s Abstract Cross Series.  All the usual elements of her crosses are represented in this painting: warm lighting, a thematic sense of mystery and heavy use of impasto technique.

What distinguishes this cross, to me, is the contemplation of the representation of The Holy Trinity. Sinclair’s “Everlasting Joy” is celestial; there is a sense that the cross came from somewhere besides an artist’s studio.  Overall, the aesthetic of the piece is one of antiquity, as if the cross was forged by an early Apostle and later placed in the Hagia Sophia until it was smuggled to a Byzantine church in Budapest after the fall of Constantinople. When I reflect upon the Holy Trinity I first think of God and His origin, coming out of the void and creating the world.

 I remember the Old Testament, a time when Western Civilization was in its infancy and the religions we have today were forming. In Exodus 3:13-14 God reveals Himself to His people: “And Moses said unto God, Behold, [when] I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say unto them, The God of your fathers hath sent me unto you; and they shall say to me, What [is] his name? What shall I say unto them? 14 And God said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you.”  The mysteries of God shown through the canvas’ rudimentary abstract lines and rectangular shapes, in contexts of its parts, are not initially discerned as a cross. Rather it is when the eye calculates all the lines and the shapes together that the powerful icon is revealed and the second component of the Holy Trinity is introduced.

The physical attributes of the painting correspond to the flesh and blood of Jesus Christ. Sinclair’s cross is painted in earthy tones of red, brown, gold and yellow. The reds primarily used in the painting look like dried blood, homage to the blood that Christ shed when he was crucified.  The golds and yellows are sallow soft and warm, like tones of flesh, that of the dying Savior.  The Trinity is realized by the final component, the Holy Spirit.  The three unify to become an important idea in Christian belief. "It is the Father who generates, the Son who is begotten, and the Holy Spirit who proceeds," As explained by the Lateran Council IV (1215).  In this painting first felt is the mystery of who is God. Next the physical representation of the flesh, Jesus Christ, is shown on the canvas through the physical materials of the painting, and finally, the presence of the Holy Spirit resonates from and beyond the piece. The Holy Spirit is represented by the shape of the cross which is organic like the colors. The heavy impasto layers also create movement. The paint vibrates on the canvas and burst forth in waves like the energy of the soul. It is as if the Holy Spirit comes through the paint directly to the viewer.  The idea that all three of these come together as one is symbolized by Sinclair’s cross.

Before crosses, Sinclair painted many landscapes. For me, “Everlasting Joy” is a type of landscape. It is a soulscape, a painting that mainly depicts the inner side of the artist. It is a record of her joys and sorrows and the days that she bore her soul to the canvas.  One can feel the energy of Sinclair’s bold, repetitive strokes as everlasting as the icon she paints. “I bring my spirituality to these pieces, but the people who like them and buy them bring theirs,” Sinclair says to San Antonio Women’s Magazine in a 2013 interview.  She continues to say she wants people to see the hand of God in her painting. Sinclair is also a cancer survivor and one does not have to look very hard at her painting to feel her faith and spirituality coming through.  As it is stated in 1 Corinthians 1:18 ESV: “For the word of the cross is folly to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.”

©Gina Martinez, Art Consultant, J.R. Mooney Galleries, Boerne, TX
Please Contact J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art for Availability and Pricing
1 800 537 9609 Toll Free

210 828 8214 San Antonio, TX Location
830 816 5706 Boerne, TX Location

www.jrmooneygalleries.com

Thursday, December 10, 2015

Art Consultant's Spotlight: "Jingle Bells and Powdered Snow" by G. Harvey


Dashing through the snow, as the old holiday tune goes, the winter winds brush the cheeks of these festive riders. Like the automobile of later, people of the nineteenth century not only used the sleigh for daily travel but also to race and for courting, as is exemplified in the popular holiday song by James Lord Pierpont.  However, here in Harvey’s scene, it is not racers or lovers but rather a group of people, perhaps a family, who enjoy a winter day’s outing. Their joy and excitement is felt in the impressions of their smiling faces and is reinforced by the colorful balloons held tightly by the figure seated in the back of the sleigh. Their loving pet accompanies them giving the piece an even stronger sense of family and companionship. The late afternoon light envelops the group as they dash across the trail, probably going on to another holiday party. In the yesteryear, during the snowy winter it was common to adorn horses' harnesses with bells as a way to avoid collisions. The song “Jingle Bells” gave these bells a more celebratory purpose and G. Harvey’s association with them and the powdery snow creates a holiday scene that is nostalgic and festive.


©Gina Martinez, Art Consultant, J.R. Mooney Galleries, Boerne, TX
Please Contact J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art for Availability and Pricing
1 800 537 9609 Toll Free

210 828 8214 San Antonio, TX Location
830 816 5706 Boerne, TX Location

    

Art Consultant's Spotlight: "Carriages on Canal Street" by G. Harvey


The streets of New Orleans are usually warm and muggy. The mighty Mississippi River can generate enough fog to blanket all of downtown and the Central Business District for days at a time. However, in winter the warm humidity is replaced by a wet cold that all Southerners will swear is worse than any blizzard. This chill permeates the skin all the way to the bone, causing most to avoid the outdoors as much as possible during the brief winter.

 In this print, “Carriage on Canal,” G. Harvey depicts a New Orleans gripped by this sort of weather. Harvey chose to depict Canal Street no doubt because it is one of the city’s most recognizable thoroughfares and is an obvious choice for a backdrop which he may adorn with his signature horses, glowing street lamps and people from a bygone era. However, there is significance to choosing Canal Street as the setting of this piece. Canal Street represents the transition from old to new which is another predominant theme in Harvey’s works.  The median on Canal Street is locally referred to as the “neutral ground” and it played a very important role in New Orleans’ history and Americanization.  

At the turn of the nineteenth century Louisiana was a French colony. In 1803 France sold it, along with a large territory, to The United States. Before this time most people in the city lived in the Vieux Carré (the French Quarter). After the Louisiana Purchase, a multitude of American settlers from all over the country flocked to New Orleans, forever changing its cultural makeup. The Americans populated the uptown area, choosing to live apart from the Creoles and eventually expanded the city.  The two neighborhoods physically met at Canal Street which was named for an artificial waterway that was never realized. However, as time marched on, the median of Canal Street where the lady with the umbrella depicted in Harvey’s print stands waiting for a ride, became known as the neutral ground.  It was a place of commerce and frequented by Americans, Creoles, gens de couleur libres (Free People of Color) and Native Americans, one of the few places where the groups mingled. This division lasted into the twentieth century as more immigrants from other countries came to New Orleans thus increasing the diversity of the population.  In long coats, clutching umbrellas, the people scurry underneath the warm glow of street lamps and storefronts moving from one destination to another, trying to stay dry. They come and go, crossing back and forth over the cultural boundary divide, just as do the carriage, street car and automobile which symbolize the progress and unity of the growing city.  

The woman in the print waits on the neutral ground for a ride, shielded by her umbrella and the thin trees. Approaching is a horse-drawn carriage offering shelter and transportation. The carriage is prominent in the scene while the newer automobile and street cars remain in the background. Harvey has captured a special time in the city’s history. On Canal Street, the carriage remains regal showing that the old ways still work with the modern ones. This is equivalent to the idea that all of the cultures of the city: French Creole, Spanish, Native, Caribbean, African and American can coexist, especially when they have a place to come together and meet.

 It is important to the prosperity of the city for the different groups to come together.  In Harvey’s world as shown on Canal Street, the horse is equal to the automobile, just as the two cultures are intertwined with one another.
 
 
©Gina Martinez, Art Consultant, J.R. Mooney Galleries, Boerne, TX
Please Contact J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art for Availability and Pricing
1 800 537 9609 Toll Free
210 828 8214 San Antonio, TX Location
830 816 5706 Boerne, TX Location

 

Art Consultant's Spotlight: "The Toy Shop" by G. Harvey


“The Toy Shop” is a holiday scene that is still very familiar to parents and grandparents alike today. Even though the piece depicts another time, all viewers can relate to the feeling created by the work. Snow covers the turn of the twentieth century town.  The shorter day has passed and twilight falls upon the streets. The glow from the lamps and lights in the stores create a cozy atmosphere for the people out shopping. They wrap up their errands and prepare to return to the warmth of their homes and love of their families. The protagonist in this scene is a small child who has accompanied his father on this cold wintry day. The child stands at the window of a toy shop. He gently pulls at his father’s coat and points to something in the window. The father, lovingly attentive to the child, already has a rather large wrapped gift in hand. However, the little one has spied something in the window, just one more thing he wants for Christmas. With childlike urgency, he tugs at his father’s coat to make sure he knows the importance of the coveted item. The father placates him, as all parents or grandparents do, with his attention. Maybe what the child wants is already wrapped up in the father’s arms. Perhaps it’s waiting to be put under the tree and to be discovered as a gift from Santa Claus on Christmas day. The child’s coat is red, the only figure not dressed in black, representing the predominant color of the holiday season and the color of Santa’s coat. It also symbolizes the excitement of youth. He is the only figure to face the viewer, and it is delightful to feel the impression of his smile, the wide-eyed wonder and excitement that the holiday season brings out in children and in us all, no matter the time.
©Gina Martinez, Art Consultant, J.R. Mooney Galleries, Boerne, TX
Please Contact J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art for Availability and Pricing
1 800 537 9609 Toll Free
210 828 8214 San Antonio, TX Location
830 816 5706 Boerne, TX Location




Friday, December 4, 2015

Doc Spellmon, Gallery Acquisitions and Much More in the new edition of Plumage-TX Magazine








The new edition of Plumage-Tx is out. In this month's magazine,  spotlight feature articles are focused on F.L. "Doc" Spellmon, the "Texas Vintage" exhibition, new gallery acquisitions, and much much more.












Here are some previews of select articles in this month's edition!



Insight of the Outside by Gabriel Diego Delgado explores the artwork of F.L. "Doc" Spellmon in relation to Houston artists, Forrest Prince and Jesse Lott, and Ohio artist Rev. Albert Wagner.


http://issuu.com/gdelgado2010/docs/winter__2015_edition_of_plumage-tx_









Review of new acquisitions by Gallery Art Consultant, Gina Martinez.


http://issuu.com/gdelgado2010/docs/winter__2015_edition_of_plumage-tx_









The "Doc" is In, a critical review of the estate of F.L. "Doc" Spellmon by Art Consultant, Katherine Shevchenko


http://issuu.com/gdelgado2010/docs/winter__2015_edition_of_plumage-tx_









In the monthly column, "Fair Market / After Market" , Gallery Director, Gabriel Diego Delgado walks you through step by step on how one painting is priced on the after market circuit via comparable auction results.


http://issuu.com/gdelgado2010/docs/winter__2015_edition_of_plumage-tx_






New framing lines and recent custom mouldings available at the custom framing counter at J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art


http://issuu.com/gdelgado2010/docs/winter__2015_edition_of_plumage-tx_









Opening night pictures of the "Texas Vintage" exhibition at the J.R. Mooney Galleries-Boerne location on Nov. 7, 2015


http://issuu.com/gdelgado2010/docs/winter__2015_edition_of_plumage-tx_





Copyright © 2015 J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art, All rights reserved.
News and Reviews from JR Mooney Galleries of Fine Art / San Antonio- Boerne, TX

Our mailing address is:
J.R. Mooney Galleries of Fine Art
8302 Broadway Street, San Antonio, TX
San Antonio, TX 78209


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